Yummy Goumi Berry Syrup June 28, 2016 15:27

Homemade berry syrup, for those hot summer days! Mix it into cold water for a quick, refreshing drink.

This was my first run-in with the widely acclaimed goumi berry. This little fruit grows like crazy in the Cascadian climate, and looks almost exactly like a goji berry when picked. Like the goji, it's loaded with vitamins - but instead of many little tiny seeds it has one big olive-like pit.

A kindly gardener brought a whole gallon by the shop. After munching a few fresh (puckering our mouths to the sweet-and-sour taste) this is what I did with my share.

fresh goumi berries

2 cups of fresh goumi berries go into a pot (yes, I used a camp stove!)

goumi berries with cane sugar

The berries are pretty tart, and a bit of sugar helps pull the moisture out and get the pot bubbling with just a few tablespoons water added.

goumi syrup

It took about 15 minutes at a good boil for the pulp to break down enough to fall off the pits.

straining the goumi syrup

When the berries were well-broken down and the whole mix reduced by about 1/3, I transferred it to a waiting cloth-lined colander. The mix was very pulpy and I squeezed the cloth bundle quite a bit to help push the pulp through.

goumi syrup stains gloves

I got my mozzarella gloves all red with all the squeezing! The leftover pulp is tucked up in the cloth on the left. It was mainly pits at this point, so into the compost it went.

goumi syrup is very thin

With the volume reduction, I'd hoped whatever natural pectin the goumi contains would help thicken the syrup to spreadable consistency. It was even runnier than pictured here though.

transferring goumi syrup to a swing top bottle

so I transferred it to a nice swing-top bottle for easier pouring!

Homemade  berry syrup, for those hot summer days! Mix it into cold water for a quick, refreshing drink.

A splash of syrup in a glass of water made a nice refreshing drink for this hot day! I also enjoyed a few tablespoons in a mug of milk kefir (although delicious, the ladder took on the appearance of clotted vomit).

by Rick Havlak